BMW Redesigns Concept Car Garmisch

BMW had an uncommon event at the automobile event at the Concorso d’Eleganza Villa d’Este. The company redesigned its 1970 concept vehicle, the BMW Garmish.

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The first Garmisch, which was showcased by Marcelo Gandini at the 1970 Geneva Motor Show, was presented to car lovers with its 2019 model. Gandini, who has his signature on legendary cars such as Lamborghini Miura and Countach, Lancia Stratos, played a key role in the design of the vehicle.

Redesigning this concept vehicle was initially quite a challenge for BMW. The only available source for the tool consisted of several black and white images. Now 80 years old, Gandini dug deep into his memory and played an important role in redesigning the vehicle. Gandini says the vehicle is difficult to distinguish from the original.

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Adrian van Hooydonk, senior vice president of BMW Design, said in a statement:

“For me, Marcello Gandini is one of the great experts in automobile design and his cars have always been a major source of inspiration for my work. Building the BMW Garmisch for the second time gave us the opportunity to pay homage to Gandini, recall one of his lesser-known cars, and highlight Bertone’s stylistic influence on the evolution of BMW design.”

The most distinctive design element of the car is the new interpretation of the kidney grille, which has become BMW’s signature. Square and glass-covered headlights were also quite new and different for BMW at the time. The honeycomb mesh design on the rear windows, one of the most distinctive features of the Gandini design, was used in the new Garmisch. Garmisch was built on the BMW 2002 vehicle.

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The concept car also features other minor design details such as a vertically oriented radio, a large folding mirror in the drawer-like glove compartment, and covers on the C-pillar. The vehicle is named after Garmisch, an upmarket German ski village that hosted the 1936 Winter Olympics.

Some parts of the vehicle were produced using 3D printing technologies. All the pieces were assembled by a craftsman in Turin, Italy. The original Garmisch was also assembled here before the Geneva Motor Show in 1970.

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